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  • Would you believe that the amphibious military branch that is known for being “first in and last out” were founded before America declared independence from England? This largest bronze statue in the world was dedicated in 1954 between Arlington Cemetery and the city of Rosslyn, VA by President Dwight David Eisenhower.
  • Swedish granite with writings of gold which lists around the Marines Memorial better known as the “Iwo Jima” memorial, all of the major battles America has been a part of such as Libya, Iraq, Belleau Wood, and Guadalcanal.
  • Associated Press photographer captured the five marines and one navy corpsman raising the old glory above Mount Suribachi on the island of Iwo Jima. Photographer Joe Rosenthal would end up winning a Pulitzer Prize the same year the photo was released in 1945.
  • Sculptor Felix de Weldon had marines like Rene Gagnon pose in order to create a life-like depiction of the iconic photo. De Weldon had the inscription “Semper Fidelis” which is Latin for “Always Faithful”.
  • The United States wanted to end World War II by staging a huge invasion of Japan since the Japanese leadership would not surrender. After a month of carnage and thousands of casualties from both sides, America wins but uses plan B to stop the Imperial Japanese: an atomic bomb.
  • There is information around this spectacular memorial dedicated to the “Leathernecks” including the identities of the brave men. Three of the six did not make it off the island in early 1945. Yet the Marine Corps will always be known for “Uncommon Valor being a common virtue.”

The United States Marine Corps War Memorial (Iwo Jima Memorial) is a United States military monument sited at the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery and next to the Netherlands Carillon, in Arlington Ridge Park, Arlington, Virginia. The memorial is dedicated to all personnel of the United States Marine Corps who have died in the defense of the United States since 1775.

The memorial features the statues of the six servicemen who raised the second U.S. flag on Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima in World War II, on February 23, 1945, five Marines and one Navy corpsman: Sergeant Michael Strank, Corporal Harlon Block, Private First Class Rene Gagnon, Private First Class Ira Hayes, Private First Class Franklin Sousley, and Pharmacist Mate Second Class John Bradley (USN).