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  • The Air and Space Museum is the most visited of All the Museums in Washington, it opened in 1976.
  • The Rutan Voyager is on display in the Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall. This is one of the first things you will see when you enter.  In 1986, the Voyager demonstrated the strength and efficiency of an all-composite air frame by flying nonstop around the world without refueling.
  • The Starship Enterprise is also on display Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall when you enter. The Enterprise was meant to travel many times beyond light speed, powered by a controlled matter/anti-matter system, a propulsion concept "stretched" from a then-accepted theory. The fictional ship grossed 190,000 tons, and measured 947 feet long and 417 feet in diameter. The saucer-shaped hull included 11 decks, and had a crew complement of 430.
  • The most significant pre-Wright brothers aeronautical experimenter was the German glider pioneer Otto Lilienthal. Between 1891 and 1896, he built and flew a series of highly successful full-size gliders. Beyond his technical contributions, he sparked aeronautical advancement from a psychological point of view, as well by unquestionably demonstrating that gliding flight was possible. He was a great inspiration to the Wright brothers in particular. They adopted his approach of glider experimentation and used his aerodynamic data as a starting point in their own research.
  • An original Wright brothers-built bicycle, one of only five in the world, is on display in the Wright Brothers Exhibit on the 2nd floor at the Air and Space Museum. In 1898 this bicycle sold for $42.50.  Notice the rims are made of wood.
  • Before the Wright Brothers began their research of flight, they first wrote to the Smithsonian Institution in May of 1899 to request information about publications on aeronautics. At this time, they were not the "Wright Brothers" who flew the first airplane; they were simply two brothers who owned a bicycle shop in Dayton, Ohio.
  • That letter is also on display in the Wright Brothers Exhibit.
  • In 1927 Charles Lindbergh's flight between New York and Paris was very long, risky, and physically demanding. Though he was not the first to cross the Atlantic, Lindbergh made the first solo nonstop transatlantic flight between two major cities. News spread quickly as Lindbergh's flight stunned and amazed people around the world.
  • Amelia Earhart set two of her many aviation records in this bright red Lockheed 5B Vega. In 1932 she flew it alone across the Atlantic Ocean, then flew it nonstop across the United States-both firsts for a woman. Amelia Earhart bought this 5B Vega in 1930 and called it her "Little Red Bus."
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The X-15 rocket-powered research aircraft bridged the gap between manned flight within the atmosphere and manned flight beyond the atmosphere into space. After completing its initial test flights in 1959, the X-15 became the first winged aircraft to attain velocities of Mach 4, 5, and 6 (four, five, and six times the speed of sound). Because of its high-speed capability, the X-15 had to be designed to withstand aerodynamic temperatures on the order of 1,200 degrees F.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • On October 14, 1947, the Bell X-1 became the first airplane to fly faster than the speed of sound. Piloted by U.S. Air Force Capt. Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, the X-1 reached a speed of 1,127 kilometers (700 miles) per hour, Mach 1.06, at an altitude of 43,000 feet.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.
  • The Air and Space Museum is a personal favorite, be sure to see the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a lunar rock you can touch.